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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 6:33 pm 
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Two Kuberts and Darwyn Cooke connected to new Comedian, Nite Owl comics mini-series.

http://www.watchmencomicmovie.com/120511-watchmen-comic-prequels-kubert-cooke.php

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 7:36 pm 
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DoomsdayClock wrote:
Two Kuberts and Darwyn Cooke connected to new Comedian, Nite Owl comics mini-series.

http://www.watchmencomicmovie.com/120511-watchmen-comic-prequels-kubert-cooke.php


I really want Cooke to write and draw all of them, just because he is truly a master of his craft.

Nothing at all against the Kuberts, but Cooke has such a delightfully retro style that would fit the prequel style of these new books.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 8:53 pm 
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Did you really need to be so harsh on Johnston? Isn't he doing exactly what you are?

Anywho, I wonder if that quote at the end came from the gentleman you had lunch with a while back...

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:57 am 
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and JG Jones, don't forget him too.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 9:56 am 
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AYBGerrardo wrote:
Did you really need to be so harsh on Johnston? Isn't he doing exactly what you are?

Anywho, I wonder if that quote at the end came from the gentleman you had lunch with a while back...

Didn't mean to insult Johnston at all. It's just funny that 90% of the leaks on this story just keep coming from him and his sources.

As far as the quote, I'm far less connected than Johnston, so you can probably narrow down who that quote came about 3-4 names tops.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 12:00 am 
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Shouldn't this be merged ?

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 6:40 am 
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If it's not written by Moore or drawn by Gibbons... It's fan fiction to me. I'll get them i dont doubt, but i will not be happy with myself!


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 3:33 pm 
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I was pondering this question last night, and DDC is really the only one who can answer it... how will the website refer to these new prequels? Will this section of the forum be relabels "Talk about the Watchmen comics/Graphic Novel"? I know this is kind of weird, but I was curious

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 Post subject: Comic Relief?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:26 pm 
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Since the word 'series' only exists in the plural form, then replacing this specific section heading with the relevant portion of the existing main forum subtitle would still grammatically suffice:
Talk about the Watchmen comic book mini-series.

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I know this is kind of weird, but I was curious

Oh, if only there were a fellow member amongst us who organized and maintained the whole business of curiosity into a united whole; incorporated it, if you will. ;)


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 Post subject: Re: Comic Relief?
PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:13 pm 
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Writer Of Wrongs wrote:
Since the word 'series' only exists in the plural form, then replacing this specific section heading with the relevant portion of the existing main forum subtitle would still grammatically suffice:
Talk about the Watchmen comic book mini-series.

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I know this is kind of weird, but I was curious

Oh, if only there were a fellow member amongst us who organized and maintained the whole business of curiosity into a united whole; incorporated it, if you will. ;)

I don't really like putting the prequels in here. I may actually make another section for it.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:34 pm 
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wouldn't it really just go under the talk about comics section?

i mean, it's comics, but it's not the watchmen graphic novel that we all know and love.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 7:03 pm 
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WJK wrote:
wouldn't it really just go under the talk about comics section?

i mean, it's comics, but it's not the watchmen graphic novel that we all know and love.


Well, we have a section devoted to Watchmen... and like it or not these will be a part of the Watchmen mythos.

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 Post subject: Before Watchmen
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 6:24 am 
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The big announcement is here, so time for a new thread...

http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/2012/02/01 ... %E2%80%9D/

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This summer, DC Entertainment will publish all-new stories expanding on the acclaimed WATCHMEN universe. As highly anticipated as they are controversial, the seven inter-connected prequel mini-series will build on the foundation of the original WATCHMEN, the bestselling graphic novel of all time. BEFORE WATCHMEN will be the collective banner for all seven titles, from DC Comics.

“It’s our responsibility as publishers to find new ways to keep all of our characters relevant,” said DC Entertainment Co-Publishers Dan DiDio and Jim Lee. “After twenty five years, the Watchmen are classic characters whose time has come for new stories to be told. We sought out the best writers and artists in the industry to build on the complex mythology of the original.”

Stepping up to the challenge is a group of the comic book industry’s most iconoclastic writers and artists – including Brian Azzarello (100 BULLETS), Lee Bermejo (JOKER), Amanda Conner (POWER GIRL), Darwyn Cooke (JUSTICE LEAGUE: NEW FRONTIER), John Higgins (WATCHMEN), Adam Hughes (CATWOMAN), J.G. Jones (FINAL CRISIS), Andy Kubert (FLASHPOINT), Joe Kubert (SGT. ROCK), Jae Lee (BATMAN: JEKYLL AND HYDE), J. Michael Straczynski (SUPERMAN: EARTH ONE) and Len Wein (SWAMP THING).

BEFORE WATCHMEN includes:

RORSCHACH (4 issues) – Writer: Brian Azzarello. Artist: Lee Bermejo

MINUTEMEN (6 issues) – Writer/Artist: Darwyn Cooke

COMEDIAN (6 issues) – Writer: Brian Azzarello. Artist: J.G. Jones

DR. MANHATTAN (4 issues) – Writer: J. Michael Straczynski. Artist: Adam Hughes

NITE OWL (4 issues) – Writer: J. Michael Straczynski. Artists: Andy and Joe Kubert

OZYMANDIAS (6 issues) – Writer: Len Wein. Artist: Jae Lee

SILK SPECTRE (4 issues) – Writer: Darwyn Cooke. Artist: Amanda Conner

Each week, a new issue will be released, and will feature a two-page back-up story called CURSE OF THE CRIMSON CORSAIR, written by original series editor Len Wein and with art by original series colorist John Higgins. There will also be a single issue, BEFORE WATCHMEN: EPILOGUE, featuring the work of various writers and artists, and a CRIMSON CORSAIR story by Wein and Higgins.

“The original series of WATCHMEN is the complete story that Alan Moore and I wanted to tell. However, I appreciate DC’s reasons for this initiative and the wish of the artists and writers involved to pay tribute to our work. May these new additions have the success they desire,” said Dave Gibbons, WATCHMEN co-creator and original series artist.

“Comic books are perhaps the largest and longest running form of collaborative fiction,” said DiDio and Lee. “Collaborative storytelling is what keeps these fictional universes current and relevant.”


http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/files/2012 ... hh1223.jpg

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 Post subject: Re: Before Watchmen
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 7:34 am 
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Heat Vision: How did you become involved with Before Watchmen?

J. Michael Straczynski: The short answer is: I was asked. The long answer: Ever since Dan DiDio was handed the reins (along with Jim Lee) over at DC, he's been making bold, innovative moves that might have scared the hell out of anyone else. At a time in the industry when big events tend to be “Okay, we had Team A fight Team B last year, so this year we’re gonna have Team B fight team C!” Dan has chosen to revitalize lines, reinvent worlds and come at Watchmen head-on. It was, I think, about two years ago that he first mentioned that he was considering the idea, and he’s to be commended for fighting to make this happen.

HV: Was there any trepidation on your end to be part of this?

JMS: Anyone who sets foot into the Watchmen universe and isn’t just a little nervous should be given a few days of electroshock therapy. I’ve always considered Watchmen to be one of the best graphic novels ever written, and when it came out back in 1986 I was as blown away as everyone else. Just masterful.

The thing is, though, writers are always being asked to play in amazing universes created by other people, and you can’t let that scare you. If Darren Aronofsky can plan for a Noah’s Ark movie, Steven Spielberg can consider tackling the story of Moses, and Mel Gibson can do another Bible movie, I think it’s safe to say that the Watchmen universe is fair game, provided that you approach the work with clean hands and good intent.

HV: How do you think this will be judged and accepted considering 1) Alan Moore's stance against continuing the Watchmen universe, and 2) the sacred hold Watchmen has on readers?

JMS: The perception that these characters shouldn’t be touched by anyone other than Alan is both absolutely understandable and deeply flawed. As good as these characters are – and they are very good indeed – one could make the argument, based on durability and recognition, that Superman is the greatest comics character ever created. But I don’t hear Alan or anyone else suggesting that no one other than Shuster and Siegel should have been allowed to write Superman. Certainly Alan himself did this when he was brought on to write Swamp Thing, a seminal comics character created by Len Wein.

Leaving aside the fact that the Watchmen characters were variations on pre-existing characters created for the Charleton Comics universe, it should be pointed out that Alan has spent most of the last decade writing very good stories about characters created by other writers, including Alice (from Alice in Wonderland), Dorothy (from Wizard of normal">Oz), Wendy (from Peter Pan), as well as Captain Nemo, the Invisible Man, Jeyll and Hyde, and Professor Moriarty (used in the successful League of Extraordinary Gentlemen). I think one loses a little of the moral high ground to say, “I can write characters created by Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle and Frank Baum, but it’s wrong for anyone else to write my characters.”

The whole point of having great characters is the opportunity to explore them more deeply with time, re-interpreting them for each new age. That DC allowed these characters to sit on a shelf for over two decades as a show of respect is salutary, but there comes a time when good characters have to re-enter the world to teach us something about ourselves in the present.

HV: Why do a prequel and not a sequel?

JMS: Alan spends a lot of time in the original Watchmen teasing out details of the history of our characters before the time in which the graphic novel is set. In so doing, he gave us an excellent road map that would let us hew more truly to the characters than by telling a story that takes place after those events. The first time all of us got together in New York to solidify the storyline, we each had copies of Watchmen in hand and whenever a question was raised about what happened to whom and when, we’d flip through looking for the slightest clue. I joked at the time that it looked a lot like Saturday afternoon Bible Study.

HV: How did you end up writing Nite Owl and Dr. Manhattan? Did you have a say over which characters you would write?

JMS.: I wanted those characters because they are kind of bookends from a power standpoint. Despite his really cool gadgets, Nite Owl is in many ways the closest we have to a regular guy. He’s not a near-nutbar like Rorschach, he’s not the smartest guy in the world like Ozymandius, doesn’t have the powers of Dr. Manhattan...he’s the most normal guy in the bunch and that means he has to work really hard to get things done. By contrast, Dr. Manhattan has nearly godlike powers. So they’re at opposite ends of the power spectrum, and that contrast appealed to me immensely.

HV: Did the writers work together to any degree?

J.M.S.: There was a summit and we’ve been emailing each other and using a website to upload ideas, scripts, outlines and ask each other questions. We worked out a ridiculously detailed timeline for all of the characters, and took great pains to not step on each other’s toes. It’s really like a hive-mind in that respect.

HV: Which Nite Owl are you focusing on? (Or both?)

JMS.: My focus is on the second Nite Owl, Dan Dreiberg, though the first Nite Owl shows up in the story, along with many of the other characters.

HV:What is the plot and setting?

JMS.: I wanted to show how Dan became the second Nite Owl, what circumstances led to him as a kid to reach out to the first Nite Owl with the goal of becoming a hero...the road that led him to that point, and where it took him as he assumed that role. I also wanted to show how his friendship with Rorschach began, how it worked while they were together, and why it ultimately fell apart...all of this set against a series of murders that they are drawn into.

HV: Are the prequels all connected?

JMS: There’s some overlap here and there, but it’s more thematic than plot-oriented. I think DC wanted to give each writer the room to really play with the characters he was given without worrying too much about tying it in with everyone else’s story. At some point, the integrity of each of the miniseries would be compromised trying to do that. Instead, we were free to really follow the story of each hero cleanly. One of the things that has bugged me about recent comics publishing “events” is that the individual characters or titles are too often sacrificed to the vested interests of that event; here, DC turned the formula upside down and let the “event” serve the individual characters.

Something I said in the room ended up becoming the thematic core of the series, which is my sense that there are five kinds of truth: the truth you tell to casual acquaintances, the truth you tell to you family and close friends, the truth you tell to only a very few people in your life, the truth you tell yourself and the truth you don't admit even to yourself. So these books are really about what we think we know about these characters, and the truth.

HV: And if this is successful, will there be a sequel to the prequel? And are there any plans to eventually integrate this universe with the broader DC Universe?

JMS: Both of those are questions for Dan DiDio. I’m just glad to have a chance to play with these characters right now. The future will attend to itself, it always does.

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 Post subject: Re: Before Watchmen
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 7:55 am 
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Ozymandias cover

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/02/ ... -watchmen/

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Everything old at DC Comics is new again, again. Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ canonical miniseries about superheroes and power — and their horrific abuses — is being predictably rebooted as a prequel franchise.

Just don’t call it a reboot, said Before Watchmen series editor and Wolverine and Swamp Thing co-creator Len Wein, who also served as Moore and Gibbons’ original Watchmen editor in the 1980s.

“To me, a reboot is what DC is essentially doing with the New 52, which is changing costumes, origins, relationships, essentially looking at old characters through new eyes,” Wein said in an e-mail to Wired. “What we’re doing is filling in a lot of the blank spaces in a story that has already, to some degree, been told. There were still a lot of gaps in the histories of Watchmen‘s characters, and events only mentioned in passing or touched on briefly in the original story. We’re filling in those gaps in the most creative and inventive ways we can.”

Those gaps, however, will have to be filled without the help of the outspoken and influential Moore, who told Wired.com in 2010 that DC Comics offered Watchmen back to him if he “would agree to some dopey prequels and sequels.”

“So I just told them that if they said that 10 years ago, when I asked them for that, then yeah it might have worked,” Moore added. “Certainly, I don’t want it back under those kinds of terms. I don’t even have a copy of Watchmen in the house anymore.”

Gibbons has, however, given his stamp of approval to the sprawling project, which includes seven prequel miniseries based on Watchmen‘s violently unhinged superheroes, who alongside Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns rebooted the entire comics industry in the ’80s, and Hollywood film franchises shortly thereafter.

“To the best of my knowledge, while both Alan and Dave are aware of what we’re doing, I don’t believe anyone at DC has spoken to Alan at all, which seems to be the way he prefers it,” Wein told Wired.com. “And Dave, I believe, was invited to participate but declined.”

Declined, yes. But ultimately Gibbons respected what DC wanted to do. Although his vision of completion somewhat diverges with Wein’s assessment of Watchmen‘s narrative gaps.

“The original series of Watchmen is the complete story that Alan Moore and I wanted to tell,” Gibbons said in Wednesday’s announcement. “However, I appreciate DC’s reasons for this initiative and the wish of the artists and writers involved to pay tribute to our work. May these new additions have the success they desire.”

Before Watchmen’s prequels arrive as weekly issues starting this summer, and feature a host of talents culled from DC Comics’ deep bench. Writer Brian Azzarello reconstructs with artist Lee Bermejo the Randian antihero Rorschach for four issues, and also teams up with artist J.G. Jones on the bloodthirsty six-issue Comedian. Writer Darwyn Cooke fleshes out the Silk Spectre with artist Amanda Conner for four issues, but handles both duties on the martial Minutemen‘s six-issue run.

Writer J. Michael Straczynski helms Nite Owl‘s four-issue run with sibling art stunners Andy and Joe Kubert. But he lands the motherlode with artist Adam Hughes on Dr. Manhattan‘s four-issue miniseries, which rebrands the character’s fascinating fourth-dimensional godhood. Wein himself revisits Watchmen‘s pivotal Ozymandias, whose retconning may prove complicated, given the eerily prescient conclusion of Moore and Gibbons’ pre-9/11 power fable.

Each issue will also feature a two-page backup story called Curse of the Crimson Corsair, a riff on Watchmen‘s subnarrative Tales of the Black Freighter, whose metafictional shout-outs to Bertolt Brecht as well as the exploitative EC Comics mirrored Watchmen’s main plot with disturbing dimension.

Both Curse of the Crimson Corsair and the circular single-issue Before Watchmen: Epilogue are written by Wein, but it is Ozymandias’ retconned über-mensch who’s most fraught with meaning.

“I’m examining a lot of what it means to be the smartest man in the world, how that knowledge both weighs on one’s morality and yet frees it at the same time,” said Wein. “Adrian Veidt is a fascinating character to write. It’s not easy realizing you’re the only person who can save the world from nuclear destruction, and you lose a whole lot of your soul along the way.”

Taken together, Before Watchmen‘s extensive mining of the cultural capital and revenue streams of the best-selling graphic novel of all time should rewire industry expectations for 2012 as capably as the New 52 reportedly revitalized 2011. Package its issues alongside Curse of the Crimson Corsair and Before Watchmen: Epilogue into a blockbuster hardcover, and more earnings could roll in.

An animated or feature film series would also make sense, as would console and online games, but DC Comics would not comment on whether or not they’ve planned that far ahead. However, it’s all part of the reboot shuffle, which has become indispensable in an culture industry that long ago stopped calling derivative a dirty word.

“As far as I know there are no plans for more books after this, but 25 years ago there were no plans for these books, so who truly knows?” asked Wein. “I think reboots are almost mandatory in an industry that has existed for over three-fourths of a century now. The need to inject new blood, new ideas, new approaches, is the only thing that keeps our readers coming back for more.”

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 Post subject: Re: Before Watchmen
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 8:06 am 
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CBR News: Let's start at the beginning of all this, for you, at least. When, exactly, do you recall the idea of work within the "Watchmen" world being floated your way by DC, and what was your initial response? From there, how long did it take you to develop ideas for the characters and begin work on the series you're tackling here?

J. Michael Straczynski: The first time Dan DiDio mentioned it was, I believe, a couple of years ago, in a "wouldn't it be cool if...?" sort of way. Initially, I think he was looking at a way to go slowly with one or two characters, such as Dr. Manhattan, but gradually grew to believe there might be a larger canvas on which he could make this happen. But that's emblematic of how Dan works; he really focuses in on the characters and has shown himself willing to reinvent titles, characters, worlds and situations to make them more current and contemporary, as he did with the recent multi-title relaunches and the Earth One OGNs.

The easy path to an event is, "Okay, we're going to come up with a reason for the Justice League to fight the Justice Society -- then, next summer, we'll find an excuse for the Justice Society to fight the Teen Titans -- and then the Teen Titans and the Justice Society can fight the Justice League and the Challengers of the Unknown!" And there are plenty of good reasons to go that way. Lord knows, it's safer. The harder, and riskier path is to reconsider and relaunch every major title in your library, or in this case, to bring back characters and a universe no one has dared touch in 25 years and say, "Okay, what can these characters tell us about the world we live in as seen through the eyes of readers in 2012 that's new? What can we learn from them? What kinds of stories can we tell about them now that we couldn't tell 25 years ago?" It's a gutsy move, any way you want to slice it.

So I was very excited by the idea, especially as it began to broaden to the full cast of the Watchmen, and began working on ideas almost immediately. You have to understand that, like probably everyone reading this, "Watchmen" is one of my all-time favorite books and maybe one of the best ever done in the field. (My other favorite is Alan Moore's "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" which is absolutely off the scale, quality-wise.)

I think one of the biggest questions readers are going to have when they hear this news is simple "Why do this?" The original "Watchmen" (gosh it sounds strange to say it that way) is a work that many consider to be just about perfect as it is, and despite having a rich world behind it, the story itself doesn't leave a lot of mysteries begging to be solved. Why do you think this kind of prequel project is a worthwhile creative undertaking for you or for anyone?

The flip-side to that question, then, is "Why do anything based on something that was well done?" It's weirdly counter-intuitive: the characters are great, the world is terrific, we created something amazing here, so, God -- let's never ever do that again. Run away!

A lot of folks feel that these characters shouldn't be touched by anyone other than Alan, and while that's absolutely understandable on an emotional level, it's deeply flawed on a logical level. Based on durability and recognition, one could make the argument that Superman is the greatest comics character ever created. But neither Alan nor anyone else has ever suggested that no one other than Shuster and Siegel should ever be allowed to write Superman. Alan didn't pass on being brought on to write Swamp Thing, a seminal comics character created by Len Wein, and he did a terrific job. He didn't say "No, no, I can't, that's Len's character." Nor should he have.

Of course, when the news hits there will be a lot of talk about what the original "Watchmen" creators make of all this with Alan Moore having largely washed his hands of the property and Dave Gibbons giving his blessing to the new project via DC's PR. Do either of their opinions impact how you'll approach your work?

Again: on an emotional level, I get it. But by the same token, Alan has spent most of the last decade writing some very, very good stories about characters created by other writers, including Alice (from Wonderland), Dorothy (from Oz), Wendy (from Peter Pan), as well as Captain Nemo, the Invisible Man, Jekyll and Hyde and Professor Moriarty. I think one loses a little of the moral high ground to say, "I can write characters created by Jules Verne, HG Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle and Frank Baum, but it's wrong for anyone else to write my characters."

The lack of his blessings has no more impact on the actual storytelling process than would be the case if we had his blessings. The story has to stand on its own. A crappy story wouldn't be helped by having his blessings, and a good one isn't made better for it. Would it be nice? Sure. I'd love it. Again, I have always been a massive fan of Alan's work. Back when I worked on "The New Twilight Zone," I tracked him down and, after pulling every string I could find, managed to get him on the phone to ask if he'd please consider writing an episode. (He said no.) Alan is the best of us. I've said repeatedly, online and at conventions, that on a scale from 1-10, Alan is a full-blown 10. I've not only said it, more importantly, I've always believed it.

Let's talk about the stories you'll be telling in and of themselves. While the entirety of the main cast in "Watchmen" get their due in the story, I've always found Dr. Manhattan's story to be the real compelling and tragic heart of the piece (though most folks would probably argue Rorschach). What was it about Jon Osterman as a character, both before and after his transformation into a godlike being, that drew you in to wanting to tell more of his story?

You're precisely right in saying that he was the "tragic heart" of the story, in many ways because he was the most self-aware of the bunch. The more one lives a non-self-examined life, deciding early on this is how the world works and never swerving from that, the more one can ignore one's own faults and mistakes. It puts you on a track and carries you through whatever you encounter with the burden of ambiguity.

But Dr. Manhattan is aware of everything he's done, right or wrong, at every instant of his life, simultaneously. He is in a constant state of self-reflection, and cursed with knowing the limits of free will in a quantum-based universe, which is a fascinating contrast to someone who is as powerful as he is. He is limitless in power and utterly limited by his ability to perceive time, space and causality as they actually are. He can't look at the path and choose differently because he can see into the future to know he's already chosen. The math on that alone is enough to stun a physicist at 20 paces.

There's another area, another aspect to his character, that is almost subliminal but bears mentioning as it does impact both the original Watchmen and the new miniseries. If you look at the progression of nearly all of the other characters, it's a path from light to dark, from optimism to cynicism. But if you look at Jon before and after his transformation, you almost see the opposite happening. This was a guy who lived for numbers, for clockwork precision, who took tiny things apart and put them together again. His vision was tunneled and precise and microscopic in its scale.

Now comes the transformation, and he goes from a micro view of the universe to a macro view. It opens him up to beauty in a way he could never even conceive of prior to that event. He becomes cosmic, nearly god-like in his understanding. That makes it, in a way, a journey from darkness into light, from limits into limitless, and thus the polar opposite of most of the other characters. He can see it all...and that's amazing. The chance to examine his transformation, what it meant and what it cost in going from human to something more profound, is what drew me to this character.

In that seminal fourth issue of "Watchmen," we learn an awful lot about Dr. Manhattan's life, front to back. Does your series "walk between the rain drops" of that story, or is there another piece of the puzzle you felt could be more fully explored here?

It's both, really. We are all being very meticulous in how we tie in the events of our stories with the original "Watchmen." The first time we all met secretly in New York to discuss all this, we kept copies of "Watchmen" close at hand and whenever a question was raised about what happened to whom and when, we'd flip through looking for the slightest clue. I joked at the time that it looked like Saturday afternoon Bible Study.

I was very careful to stay within the parameters of what Alan created for Dr. Manhattan. But at the same time, you need the elbow room to create a story worth telling, which means something new has to be created. In this case, it came through looking at what Alan had done and asking the next logical question within that framework. As one example: it's always bothered me that someone as brilliant and precise about time as Jon could just blithely walk into the intrinsic field test chamber as the time-lock closed. He'd know better than that. But since it did happen, you now have to say, "Okay, that being the case, how did it happen? Is there something we don't know? Or more to the point, was there something he didn't know?"

Asking that question, and a number of others, began to have a profound effect on both the story and Dr. Manhattan himself. The result, for lack of a less dopey term, is a reexamination of the facts in the case on a quantum level that will branch out to have very large consequences.

Of course, one of the best known things about "Watchmen" is its very formal structure, from the nine-panel grid basis for its pages on down to the little details of certain issues. How did you tackle the challenge of telling stories in this world from that nuts and bolts perspective of comics as a language? Did you try and emulate certain storytelling techniques of the original or veer into completely different territory?

I didn't stick to the nine-panel thing because like most writers, I try to create a certain rhythm on the page by changing up the number of panels. But, that aside, I tried to write as much as possible in an approximation of Alan's narrative voice. In "Nite Owl," this wasn't as great a concern because that narrative voice doesn't apply as much, but Dr. Manhattan is in many ways the voice of the first book via captions, voice-overs and interior commentary. There's a certain style to Dr. Manhattan's monologues that is unique, you can hear it in your head. I worked to emulate that style, the same way anyone coming onto a TV show has to learn to write for the main character's voice. Having that background served me well in this instance.

Adam Hughes will be working with you on "Dr. Manhattan," an announcement I'm sure will turn some heads. Thought known widely for his good girl art, he definitely has a wide range of tools in his toolbox to draw from. What about his style makes him a strong collaborator for this piece?

There's a real fluidity in his work that brings a contrast to Dr. Manhattan, who, if you're not careful, can start to look very stiff. There's also an intelligence in the eyes of his subjects that I think will work well here, and a humanity that will come in handy as we get more deeply into the story of Jon himself.

Finally, I don't think it's a surprise to say that these comics are going to be more studied and scrutinized than any in recent memory considering the legacy of the original work and the discussion around its continuation. When all is said and done, what, at their core, do you hope people get out of your stories?

The whole point of having great characters is the opportunity to explore them more deeply with time, re-interpreting them for each new age. DC allowed these characters sit on a shelf for over two decades as a show of respect, and that is salutary, but there comes a time when good characters have to re-enter the world to teach us something about ourselves in the present.

Alan's original work spoke profoundly to readers in the 1980s who came through Nixon and Vietnam and the various social movements of the age. The question now becomes, what can those characters illuminate for us now, in 2012? So I think the hope is that by reviving them and peering through their eyes with a contemporary perspective, we can create stories that will entertain and illuminate. All of us involved in this want to do more than just show these guys and gals in action. We want the stories to be about something that's worth a reader's time and money to buy.

At its core, the original "Watchmen" was about the question, "Who watches the Watchmen?", which is another way of saying, "Who do you trust?" So what's the larger question here?

Dan really wanted to give each writer the freedom to play with the characters in his story without worrying too much about tying it in with everyone else's story. With four writers doing two stories each, set at different times in the Watchmen universe, with different characters, sooner or later the integrity of the various miniseries would have been compromised trying to do that. Instead, we were allowed to tell the story of each hero cleanly. I've voiced before my concern that in comic publishing events, the individual characters or titles are too often sacrificed to the vested interests that event; here, DC turned the formula upside down and let the event serve the individual characters.

But you're right in terms of having an overall story that adds up more in the end than the sum of its parts. So when we met in New York, as the day wrapped up -- there was no show runner, each of us worked on our own stories with input and reactions from everyone else -- I raised my hand and asked the very question you raise. Even though our stories are separate with some areas of overlap, there has to be a larger point to it all. What is it we're trying to say?

In the course of that conversation, I mentioned my belief that there are five kinds of truth: the truth you tell to casual acquaintances, the truth you tell to you family and close friends, the truth you tell to only a very few people in your life, the truth you tell yourself and the truth you don't admit, even to yourself. I was basically just blathering on, as I tend to do, but Dan seized on the last two of those truths as being the thematic core of the books. Darwyn did a whole discussion about this in one of his uploads, further formalizing this as the core of our story. In the end, the miniseries about the points and shadings between what we think we know about these characters, and the truth -- what that says about them, and what it says about us.

Every writer and editor on this project is a massive fan of the original book, and of Alan's work. As the months passed, we e-mailed each other with the smallest question of continuity, determined to be excruciatingly faithful to the original book because we know what's at stake. We want to add to, not subtract from, the quality of what Alan and Dave created. We know we have a hell of a legacy to live up to, and we're determined to achieve that. The scripts I've turned in so far on this project (all on deadline) are the hardest things I've ever written, because I want so much for them to be right.

They're the books I would want to read as a fan of "Watchmen." We can only hope that we got it right, that the fans approve, and that one day, one distant and much-longed for day, Alan Moore won't be mad at us anymore.

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it was tying it into the rape-revenge stories and making light of a verys erious sub-genre that kind of offended me.


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 Post subject: Re: Before Watchmen
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 8:48 am 
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I almost hate to say it buuuuuut.

all three covers look AWESOME

here's a postable size version of the ozy cover
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and comedian
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:15 am 
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...you're locked in here with me!
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Some new, interesting articles I found this morning:

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/02/ ... -watchmen/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/01/books ... 1&ref=arts

http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/20 ... um=twitter

Of course Straczynski would say what he said, he lacks the basic creativity to make anything original, or even decent if we take in consideration his latest work.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:32 am 
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feliciano182 wrote:
Some new, interesting articles I found this morning:

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/02/ ... -watchmen/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/01/books ... 1&ref=arts

http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/20 ... um=twitter

Of course Straczynski would say what he said, he lacks the basic creativity to make anything original, or even decent if we take in consideration his latest work.


not sure why we now have 2 threads, which thread should we use?

should DDC now make a new sub forum? i think is the main question

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 Post subject: Re: Before Watchmen
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:53 am 
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Oh how the ghost of you clings...
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God help us all...

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