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PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 3:29 pm 
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So I'm watching Nosferatu (a German unofficial Dracula adaptation) and I'm noticing some interesting similarities to Marooned.

One of the first lines of dialogue (via title card, of course) is "You cannot escape your destiny by running away". Our protagonist, Hutter (i.e. Harker) has gone to Transylvania to meet Count Orlock (Dracula). Uh oh - Drac was just about to kill him, but he changed his mind - he's now setting off to get to Hutter's wife Ellen (Mina). Hutter tries to reach his home first to save his wife, but Orlock is already sailing there. Sound familiar?

According to Thomas Elsaesser (Six Degrees of Nosferatu, Sight and Sound, 2001), Nosferatu and Dracula "bear a family resemblance to the 'appointment in Samarra' story".

Wikipedia wrote:
A merchant in Baghdad sends his servant to the marketplace for provisions. Shortly, the servant comes home white and trembling and tells him that in the marketplace he was jostled by a woman, whom he recognized as Death, and she made a threatening gesture. Borrowing the merchant's horse, he flees at top speed to Samarra, a distance of about 75 miles (125 km), where he believes Death will not find him. The merchant then goes to the marketplace and finds Death, and asks why she made the threatening gesture. She replies, "That was not a threatening gesture, it was only a start of surprise. I was astonished to see him in Baghdad, for I had an appointment with him tonight in Samarra."

Of course, Marooned has its own extra twist. Still, interesting to see where its inspiration may well have come from.

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it was tying it into the rape-revenge stories and making light of a verys erious sub-genre that kind of offended me.


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PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 4:09 pm 
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Your comparisons are intriguing, but I doubt they were intentional. At its heart, the Black Freighter tale is about a protagonist trying to reach a certain point before the villain does. That's at least 2/3rds of every story ever written, really.

Part of the reason why TotBF works so well -- aside from its parallels to the main story -- is because underneath the dense smbolism, dark prose and unsettling imagery, it's actually a very simple and archetypal story.

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PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 4:22 pm 
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Oh yes, absolutely, but the Samarra story is ancient and widespread enough (it was apparently even in the Talmud Bavli) that it might itself be considered the archetype.

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it was tying it into the rape-revenge stories and making light of a verys erious sub-genre that kind of offended me.


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