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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 9:33 pm 
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Moderators, I'm sorry if this is an inappropriate place for this, I figured it was either this forum or the miscellaneous Watchmen forum. Feel free to put it somewhere else if this is in the wrong place.

Obviously, we've all been affected to some great extent by Watchmen or we wouldn't be on this forum. We all feel a great connection to and great understanding of the novel. But I was wondering what books, if any, have affected the members of this board similarly.

For me, Catch-22, Crime & Punishment, 1984 and A Heartbreaking Work Of Staggering Genius all make me feel the same way (but not all with the same magnitude) as I do about Watchmen.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 9:46 pm 
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Twilight. Just Kidding :P

Hurm. I can't seem to think of any books off of the top of my head that have affected me anywhere near as much as Watchmen.

I...will get back to you.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 10:08 pm 
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As far as Graphic Novels go, only Maus touched me as deeply as Watchmen.

As far as all novels go, 1984, Animal Farm, Ender's Game and Foundation, in different forms, have impacted me as much as Watchmen.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 10:29 pm 
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I moved the topic and left a shadow thread. This way, it has a foot in both sections of the forum.

For my part, I should probably acknowledge that the Harry Potter books played a considerable role in my childhood. It did for everyone in my generation. With that out of the way, I should mention the Sandman series, as it was the second half of the one-two punch that brought me into graphic novels and completely changed my life.

In terms of books that engaged and challenged me on a mental and philosophical level, the only one I can recall on par with Watchmen would be Atlas Shrugged. Maybe Catch-22, but I haven't read that since a particularly hectic time during my senior year of high school. To a lesser degree, I'd also include Lamb and the Preacher series. Both works mean very much to me as works of philosophy, comedy and damn good narrative.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 11:12 pm 
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There have been many many books that have affected me over the years, Watchmen being a relatively recent addition to the list. The first book that I can remember deeply impacting my perspective on literature was Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut. Following this came the Harry Potter craze, and I became just as entrenched in that saga as everybody else my age (as Curi previously noted). The other great literary opus that impacted me in those earlier years was Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Upon entering high school, and up until today as I prepare to enter grad school, a great many other books have affected me, among these being The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, Macbeth by William Shakespeare, Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden, The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, Watership Down by Richard Adams, and American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis. I would also be remiss if I didn't mention Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a book I have loved for at least eleven years. There are, of course, many more, and I'm sure there will be many more in the future as well.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 11:19 pm 
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Ominick wrote:
There have been many many books that have affected me over the years, Watchmen being a relatively recent addition to the list. The first book that I can remember deeply impacting my perspective on literature was Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut. Following this came the Harry Potter craze, and I became just as entrenched in that saga as everybody else my age (as Curi previously noted). The other great literary opus that impacted me in those earlier years was Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Upon entering high school, and up until today as I prepare to enter grad school, a great many other books have affected me, among these being The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, Macbeth by William Shakespeare, Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden, The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, Watership Down by Richard Adams, and American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis. I would also be remiss if I didn't mention Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a book I have loved for at least eleven years. There are, of course, many more, and I'm sure there will be many more in the future as well.


Jesus, how did I forget The Lord Of The Rings and Macbeth?

Also: Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas. How could a story with such strange storytelling form such a resonant and poignant statement about American culture?


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 12:34 am 
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Some books I couldn't put down were The Time Machine and Treasure Island when I first read them. I still love those books. Kidnapped! Is another one. V For Vendetta ranks up there, as well as the Lord of the Rings saga, as well as the afforementioned 1984. Let's see, The Bad Place by Dean Koontz, and Lightning, by the same. That's what I remember now.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 12:35 am 
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Does Death Note count...?

Also The Catcher in the Rye, The Illustrated Man, The Lord of the Rings, Zodiac, The Phantom of the Opera, and anything horror-wise by Edgar Allan Poe.

Of course none of those have affected me anywhere near as much as Watchmen.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 1:22 am 
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Godziller66 wrote:
Does Death Note count...?

If we're willing to count graphic novels, then I think manga is fair game, too.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 3:35 am 
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i think everything i read effects me in some way or another, none in quite the same way as watchmen, but possibly the book (trilogy actually) that affected me the most is a little* trilogy called "The Night's Dawn Trilogy" a humble story about early 26th C life and how the universe is affected by a spontaneous emergence of deceased human souls from a hellish dimension. i know it sounds corny but it is possibly the best sci-fi series i have ever read in terms of action, plot and sense of wonder.
i say it affected me because before i read it i didn't really read at all, i would only read because i had to in English lessons, and since i read that trilogy it really was the first book i ever really enjoyed on every level.
and i suppose it affected me similarly to Watchmen in the fact that before reading Watchmen i didn't read comics/GNs and now i always have one on the go.

*i beleive it is in the region on 3600 pages, and the US publisher (Del Rey) refused to publish it in 3 volumes as it was meant to be, and published it in 6 instead.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:37 am 
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These are coming from the top of my head:

Ninety Eighty-Four - George Orwell
Battle Royale - Koushun Takami
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
Lord of the Rings - J.R.R. Tolkien
Carrie - Stephen King
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick

Goosebumps and Harry Potter were both series that got me into reading as a child so I guess they had an impact on my life too.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:55 am 
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A lot of people are listing the same books!

of course i'm not the first to mention LoTR. i read The Hobbit in, what was it, fourth grade? and the whole Tolkien universe has been ingrained in my mind since then.

i read a lot of Shakespeare in high school, that has stayed with me, notably Hamlet and Macbeth.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame was huge for me. it really messed me up. i read it years before Watchmen and like Watchmen it was one of those books that just ate me alive. amazing.

i picked up Wicked by Gregory Maguire in a bookstore without any prior knowledge of the musical. i devoured it, and today Elphaba is one of my greatest literary heroes.

Moby Dick was another big one. i know it was required reading for a lot of people in college and some even in high school; i feel bad for them. i elected to read it, and it was a huge undertaking. but i loved it. a lot of people think it's boring, from what i hear, and i don't blame them, but i was fascinated by all the history. a good percentage of what i know about whaling and the time period is stuff i retained from reading that book.

God Is Dead by Ron Currie Jr is relatively new fiction. the title grabbed me, so i read it. it was not what you expect at all, if you indeed have any expectations. yes, it's fiction, not philosophy or a collection of essays or anything like that. i recommend it highly. my copy is still with my brother, idk if i'll ever get it back. :shrug:

Silence of the Lambs is more than worth reading even if you've seen the movie a million times. i actually fell asleep holding the book (then finished it when i woke up).

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass. that one goes without saying, really. if my name on a forum or website isn't "morning glory" it's probably "thecheshirekat." i've read it more times than i care to think about. i can recite some of the poetry from memory. anyone know of the batman villain the Mad Hatter? kindred spirits, he and i.

Treasure Island. i don't think anyone should go through life without reading this book at least once. it's a staple. Long John Silver is another one of my heroes. i remember being very indignant when Pirates of the Caribbean caught on and suddenly pirates were en vogue. i was like, "I LOVED PIRATE STUFF BEFORE IT WAS COOL!"

a lot of books and short stories by Ray Bradbury. i can't name just one. i love that guy.

i read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka when i was in probably middle school. it mystified me but i was completely absorbed by it. i've read it many times since then (including in comic book form, which was awesome), and i still don't completely understand it.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest was a big one for me, so was Girl, Interrupted; come to think of it a lot of books i really loved involve someone going crazy.

a lot of books by Dean Koontz, including Twilight Eyes, Lightning, & The Mask; and Stephen King, including The Stand, Desperation, and The Eyes of the Dragon.

someone mentioned Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; i read that one for college and i never quite figured out if i liked it or not... but it certainly affected me.

also a bunch of the classics. i mean, they're the classics for a reason, right? like The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells, Bram Stoker's Dracula, R.L. Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, etc.

also Harry Potter. :shrug:

there's also Poetry; i write it, i read it, i think it, i breathe it. Emily Dickinson is my real life hero. she floors me. also Allen Ginsberg, e. e. cummings, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Pablo Neruda, Edgar Allan Poe, and about a million others. some of my favorite anthologies: Why am I grown so cold?, Poems of the Unknowable; Beach Glass; The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry; Sea Poems. Oh! and Shel Silverstein. i read a lot of him when i was a kid.

and a bunch of books by Zilpha Keatly Snyder.

man, i gotta quit while i'm ahead.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 7:28 pm 
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House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski. One of the most intriguing, disturbing reads for me. It's psychological horror and dark drama, and just plain weird. It's awesome. And you'll never look at closets the same way again.

Phantom by Susan Kay. It's based on The Phantom of the Opera and is easily one of the very best origin stories for a character I've ever read. It surpasses the original novel.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:55 pm 
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God, I forgot to mention The Count of Monte Cristo and Wuthering Heights. White Noise fucked me up.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:40 pm 
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The Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger (I love him because he never gave away film rights, and a film would just be BAD)

The picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (I adored this book, I'm not sure wh it took me so long to get through but I absolutely adored it and was satisfied on so many levels)

'Salems Lot By Stephen King (it was my gateway to his other works)

Red Tears by Joanne Kenwick (it might be Joanna)- I cant really say why I loved it so much, but it really struck a chord with me when I read it

Naughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman- If you haven't read it you must, I thought it raised some very interesting points, and found it unputdownable.

The Saga of Darren Shan - My favorite series of books as a child, I remember reading the first one in a single sitting late at night, and waiting impaitently for future installments.

His Dark Materials Trilogy by Phillip Pullman - An amazing fantasy series (shame the film adaption was dog shite)

The Trial by Franz Kafka- I really liked this book, I stopped reading for a while and when I read the trial I started reading regularly again, I really enjoyed it, more of a character study than a thriller though (it wasn't what I expected when I first picked it up)

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 7:13 pm 
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I'd have to say, for me, John Steinbeck's "Of Mice & Men."

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 9:55 pm 
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I recently finished reading Slaughterhouse-Five. That made me think about stuff and it affected me so...I'll add that to my list I guess.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:49 pm 
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Godziller66 wrote:
Does Death Note count...?



I'll take a potato chip.....


AND EAT IT!!!!!!!!!

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 12:02 am 
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Dog Carcass wrote:
Godziller66 wrote:
Does Death Note count...?



I'll take a potato chip.....


AND EAT IT!!!!!!!!!

LOL. The good thing about the manga is that it couldn't be dramatic like that and made into an internet meme.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:44 pm 
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Probably "Of Clay We Are Created"


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